Annual Disclosures (Banks, Foreign Bank Branches, Federally Regulated Trust and Loan Companies, and Cooperative Credit Associations)

Document Properties

  • Type of Publication: Guideline
  • Category: Accounting
  • Date: July 1997
  • Revised: July 2010
  • No: D-1
  • Audiences: Banks / BHC / FBB / T&L / Co-op

Introduction

This guideline outlines the financial disclosures OSFI expects federally regulated deposit-taking institutions to provide in or with their annual financial statements or annual reports in addition to, or in conjunction with, all of the disclosures required by International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) and Basel II Pillar 3Footnote 1.

Institutions that do not prepare an annual report should make these disclosures in the notes to the annual financial statements or in a supplementary management report appended to the annual financial statements. Authorized foreign banks in respect of their business in CanadaFootnote 2 that do not prepare annual financial statements should make these disclosures in the portion of their annual OSFI return that is covered by the auditor's opinion and in a supplementary management report filed with the annual OSFI return.

The guideline applies to banks, bank holding companies, FBBs, and federally regulated trust and loan companies, cooperative credit associations, and to their federally regulated deposit-taking subsidiaries, (collectively referred to as institutions). It does not apply to provincially regulated subsidiaries. It also does not apply to subsidiaries that are federally regulated deposit taking institutions themselves where their:

  • deposit liabilities are fully guaranteed by the parent and the parent is a federally regulated deposit-taking institution that meets the annual disclosure requirements; or

  • liabilities are fully guaranteed by the parent and the parent is a deposit-taking institution whose debt instruments are rated not less than "investment grade" by a widely-recognized rating agency.

Part 1 - Quantitative Disclosure

Part 1 of the guideline sets out minimum levels of quantitative disclosure for certain financial statement items. Institutions are encouraged to develop a level of disclosure that exceeds this guideline's minimum expectations and to provide information in a structure consistent with that used for management or internal reporting purposes. The minimum disclosure would be at a level of detail that makes the data useful to analysts and other readers of the information. Disclosures by category or type need not be met where the amounts are not material.

Investment and Lending Portfolios

Securities

The amounts, by residual term to maturity of the securities held to maturity, available-for-sale and securities designated as held for trading (fair value option) should also be disclosed, including at least the following time bands:

  1. one year or less,
  2. over one year to five years,
  3. over five years, and
  4. no specific maturity.

Separate disclosure is recommended, within the above four categories, (a) to (d), or as read by screen readers, categories 1 to 4, for any type of securities, that constitutes 10% or more of the fair value amount of the entire securities portfolio.

Loans and ReceivablesFootnote 3

Disclosure of the loans and receivables portfolio reported at its statement of financial position value should consist of at least the following categories:

  1. residential mortgages,
  2. non-business loans to individuals,
  3. business and government loans, and
  4. other.

Separate disclosure is recommended for any group of loans with similar characteristics within each of the above categories, such as type of borrower or industrial sector that constitutes 5% or more of the carrying amount of the entire loans and receivables portfolio.

The institution should disclose the fair value and carrying amount of loans and receivables in total, and the fair value and carrying amount relating to Canada and any other country that represents 10% or more of total loans and receivables in the portfolio.

Impairment

The institution should disclose information on impaired loans, the allowance for impairment and the charge for impairment in accordance with IFRSs and OSFI Guideline C-1, Impairment - Sound Credit Risk Assessment and Valuation Practices for Financial Instruments at Amortized Cost, and C-5, Collective Allowances - Sound Credit Risk Assessment and Valuation Practices for Financial Instruments at Amortized Cost.

Taxable Equivalent Basis

When the institution earns tax-exempt income from certain investments, including common and preferred shares, and wishes to disclose this income on a taxable equivalent basis, it should disclose its interest income and net interest income on that basis as supplementary information outside the financial statements. Disclosure should include a narrative description of the nature and magnitude of the gross-up of tax-exempt income.

Interest Rate Sensitivity Position

In disclosing the information required by IFRSs, the institution should present the carrying amounts of financial instruments in tabular form, grouped by those that are contracted to mature or reprice, as a minimum:

  1. within three months of the statement of financial position date,
  2. more than three months to one year from the statement of financial position date,
  3. more than one year to five years from the statement of financial position date, and
  4. more than five years from the statement of financial position date.

The carrying amounts of items at floating interest rates and of items that are not sensitive to interest rates should also be provided.

The institution should disclose the amount of the matching gap between assets and liabilities within each time band and separately disclose the amount of the gap in unrecognized items within each time band.

Part 2 - Risk Management and Control Practices

Part 2 outlines the disclosures OSFI expects regarding the risk management and control practices adopted by the institution.

The institution should provide all IFRSs and Basel II Pillar 3 required disclosures and should provide this qualitative disclosure in a supplementary management report appended to the annual financial statements or in a supplementary management report appended to the audited portion of the annual return in cases where annual financial statements are not prepared.

The institution should discuss the extent of any significant exposures to areas where there recently has been, or there is the potential for, significant loss due to industry specific factors or general industry recession and outline the steps it has taken to contain risks in these areas. Similarly, the institution should identify its major lines of business and describe the controls it has in place to quantify and contain the risks to the institution from exposure to these lines of business.

The institution should also discuss methods of measuring and controlling other market-related risks, such as settlement risk, where they are significant.

Where the institution is a subsidiary of another deposit-taking institution and where one or more of the risks discussed below is managed by the parent as part of a broader risk management system, then a statement to that effect will suffice. However, to the extent that under such a system the subsidiary may still be exposed to risks, including credit risk exposure to the parent, these risks should be disclosed and discussed.

Liquidity RiskFootnote 4

Liquidity risk is the risk that an entity will encounter difficulty in meeting obligations associated with financial liabilities. The institution should identify the committees of the board and management with responsibility for liquidity management, including the development, review, approval and implementation of liquidity management policies, and the procedures in place to effectively monitor and control the function. It should describe the methods used for measuring the institution's current and projected future liquidity.

The institution should include a description of its policies and performance with respect to:

  • controlling the cash flow mismatch between on- and off-balance sheet assets and liabilities;
  • maintaining stable and diversified sources of funding;
  • accessing alternative sources of funding, if required; and
  • ensuring it has sufficient liquid assets on hand in relation to its daily cash flows.

It should also explain other methods it uses for liquidity management, for example, asset securitization.

Interest Rate Risk

Interest rate risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. It can arise from trading and non-trading activities. An institution should set out its objectives and associated business strategy in interest rate risk management.

The institution should identify and describe the analytical techniques it uses (e.g., gap analysis, duration analysis, simulation models). It should also set out the key sources of interest rate risk within its portfolio given the level and shape of the yield curve at the time of disclosure.

The institution should explain how it uses derivative instruments to manage interest rate risk and provide quantitative information on the extent to which these instruments are used.

Currency Risk

Currency risk is the risk that the fair value or future cash flows of a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in foreign exchange rates.

The institution should explain how it uses derivative instruments to manage currency risk and provide quantitative information on the extent to which these instruments are used.

Footnotes

Footnote 1

See disclosure in Pillar 3 Advisory issued November 2007

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Footnote 2

Also referred to as foreign bank branches or FBBs.

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Footnote 3

Per IAS 39 paragraph 9.

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Footnote 4

This section on liquidity risk should, as applicable, be used in conjunction with Guideline B-6 on Liquidity.

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